Ghostwriting is YOU talking and me writing. YOUR voice = your story.

aghostwritingproject

What is a ghost writer?

How can a ghost writer help you write your story? If a ghost writer does help you write your story, will it still be your story?

What is the difference between a biographer and a ghost writer?

These are very good questions to ask when you have a story to tell, but feel like you may need someone to help you write.

A biographer is someone who will actually write the story for you. They may write the story in their own voice, and it may be more about facts and less about personal storytelling, but more like a story about you rather than a story that is coming from. You may not do any writing at all if you let the biography do it all for you. The biographer may interview you as part of the research, but they’re doing the integral part of writing and just telling your story for you. A biographer will write the story in whole for you, but not necessarily as you.

As a ghostwriter, I’m here to help you write your own story. I help you find your voice and shape content for your story to structure it out one chapter at a time. It will be in your voice because YOU are the author. I’ll structure and write out the details and points that we discuss for your story. However, it is you who decides the characters, people, places, things, memories, emotions, humor, drama, points in life that are relevant to the content of your story.  You decide what is to be included in your book. Any additional information, omissions and changes are entirely up to you.

We will write up drafts for your chapters and I will send it to you for review. It is good when you read the drafts and ideas related to your story because the more that we write the words will start to flow. If you keep a journal of your experiences or record your thoughts, it makes it easier to write them out into a structured outline. We can use those memories to write out your story in your voice. You may want to talk about something in your book and once it’s written and you read it you may decide that you don’t want it in your story, that is fine. This is part of the writing process. It’s great when you want to add more to the voice of the story and you want to make changes in your book because that means your creative juices are flowing! That’s the point of me helping you with ghostwriting.

Overall, my job is to help you get your ideas flowing so that together, we can write the story out of your system and put it down onto paper. Right now, I’m only doing ghostwriting. I’m not a biographer. However, I do know a couple of great biographers who are wonderful storytellers. I can provide recommendations if you’re looking for a biographer.

Contact me if you need help with writing your story. Visit http://feliciajohnsonauthor.com/services/ghostwriting/. Email me at herthebook@gmail.com.

Mental Health Talk: Guest Blog Post Author Felicia Johnson

journal

Felicia Johnson guest blogs on Mental Health Talk and shares how she suffered from depression and child abuse while growing up. It was writing that helped her through those years; a catalyst for finding an invaluable form of therapy and her voice.

This has lead Felicia to write her first novel titled Her. Based on her own experiences and those with a close friend who she lost to mental illness, she has created a story about survival and the complexity of living with Borderline Personality Disorder.

To read Felicia’s guest post on Mental Health Talk, please visit: http://mentalhealthtalk.info/writing-mental-illness

Trish Hurtubise, Founder and Editor of Mental Health Talk

Upcoming Events Including Giveaways, Free Books, Book Signings and More!

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New events are coming up soon including ‪#‎giveaways‬, speaking engagements, and book signings and readings! Be sure to check the events calendar, click here to see if I’m coming to an event near you. I look forward to seeing you!

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NAMI GA Cobb Educational Speakers Series feat. Author, Felicia Johnson Video & Testimonials

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On February 19, 2015 I had the honor of speaking at The National Alliance On Mental Illness (NAMI) NAMI Georgia, NAMI Cobb. I was part of their Education Speaker Series. Thank you to President of NAMI Cobb, Mrs. Neill Blake for inviting me out to speak to NAMI Georgia’s Cobb Chapter. Also, thank you to Mrs. Pamela Burton for her support and interest.

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I joined NAMI that evening to discuss my experience in dealing with my own experience with child abuse, depression and losing my childhood best friend to suicide. My best friend, Holly, suffered with depression and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD).

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I discussed my novel, Her, which is the story of a young girl dealing with BPD that was inspired by Holly and my journey.  My goal was to help bring understanding of BPD within reach of many young people and families afflicted.

It was heartwarming to meet with fans who follow me on on social media and who have read my books. It was so great to see people come out to support the cause. I signed a few books after the Q&A panel where I answered questions about BPD, my survival through trauma and my novel, Her.

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I continue to help many come to terms with mental health & wellness and talk about it with hopes of putting an end to the stigma that is on mental health issues today.

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Testimonials from NAMI GA, Cobb speech:

“After hearing Felicia Johnson speak about her new book, “Her,” I was amazed at her honesty and strength. While sharing feelings of her best friend who was the inspiration for the book, we became more and more interested to hear what she had to say. During the presentation, Felicia’s energy filled the room grasping our attention and I felt her life was completely changed by the relationship she had had with her close friend. I didn’t really know a lot about this mental health challenge, but now know that many people live with this little shared life struggle. From that moment, I wanted to read her book and experience the poetic language and engaging storyline that I knew would be present in the book.” – Mary McCrary

“I learned a lot about BPD and how it can effect those who care about people who suffer with it. Felicia’s story about her and her best friend brought me to tears! I can’t wait to read her book.” – Christine B.

“I wanted to read Felicia’s book to learn more about Borderline Personality Disorder. After I read it, I had to see her speak and she came around near where I live and I was happy to see her speak live. I hope that we’ll get to see her speak again. I think everyone who knows someone who has a mental illness should hear her speak about her struggle and survival and also read her book. She is moving!”  – Terri Johnson

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“I would indeed recommend asking Felicia Johnson to speak… it was an educational talk as well as an inspirational perspective of living with mental illness. I also bought and read Felicia’s novel, Her. I started it last week and read it in just a few days. It kept my attention and gave me some good insights into the dynamics of inpatient facilities. I recommend both Felicia and her book.” – Neill Blake, President of NAMI Cobb, Georgia

Click here to watch the video of the NAMI Cobb Speech.

pam burton and fee

Encouraging Our Youth: Journaling & Writing

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Thank you to a group of North Atlanta youth mentors and advocates for inviting me to speak to a wonderful group of brilliant kids who are on their way to becoming amazing young writers! I had so much fun speaking and answering questions about how journaling can jump start your writing career.

We began our day at LPYG with a lively group of teens who are part of a youth mentoring group that focuses on building life skills. Today’s topic was about how journaling can help build writing skills. Most of the youth in the group did not keep personal journals. Most of them admitted that they had not given much thought to keeping a journal. I explained that journals are used to keep personal thoughts, ideas, feelings, memories and experiences that we hold dear.

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The best part about keeping a journal is that you can write down anything you want and you do not have to share it with anyone if you do not wish to share what you’ve written. The teens seemed to like the idea of keeping a journal that they can be open with expressing themselves through words and language openly without fear of judgement. I brought a few starter journals for the teens to keep so that they can begin writing in journals. Some of them even said that they wanted to see if they could use the journals to write stories.

During the Q&A, I invited the youth to ask me questions about journaling and writing. There were a few interesting questions, but the one question that stood out to me the most was from a 14 year old girl named Shamiya. Shamiya said that she was interested in writing a memoir about her life when she grows up. She asked me, “If I write in a journal, will I be able to make it into a book about my life?”

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I encouraged Shamiya to keep a detailed journal and write in it daily especially if she wants to write a memoir one day. A daily journal will hold memories that she may not be able to remember in the future. Writing in a journal can help with keeping your most sacred and cherished memories for you so that when you want to look back and reminisce or recall the memory to write your memoir, the memories will be there.

Everyone seemed to be happy with the idea of keeping a journal. Some of them began writing in the journals as soon as I handed them out. When I was asked to share something from my journal, I helped them to appreciate the privacy of a journal. I told them that the privilege of having a journal is so that you can keep your thoughts private until you’re ready to share. For example, when I had written in my journals as a teen, I did not want to share what I had written about my memories of my late best friend Holly and what it was like for me growing up with major depression. It wasn’t until I grew up and decided to write a book about surviving child abuse and mental health that I decided to share thoughts from my journals. It’s more relevant now today because now my book can actually help other people who are dealing with those same issues.

My hope is that the teens were inspired by my experience with journaling and how it helped me build my writing career. I hope that they will write in their journals even if it’s just to have a way to release their thoughts and feelings openly and freely. I look forward to following up with them and their mentors to see how they are using their journals.

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Please visit my website to find out more about mentoring and speaking and to find out how you can book me to speak at your next event: http://www.feliciajohnsonauthor.com

Once Upon A Bookshelf Book Review of Her by Felicia Johnson

Once Upon A Bookshelf

A Reader’s Blog

HER 
 
Posted by Courtney Wilson @ 8:08 am June 19, 2014.
Category: Young Adult
Book Author(s):
Publisher(s):      Her front cover
Author: Felicia Johnson
Originally Published: 2013
Publisher: 8th Street Publishing
Source: Received a copy from the author

When I did the interview with Felicia Johnson, I received a digital copy of her book. The topic really intrigued me. I’m a proponent for the end of the stigma surrounding mental illnesses, disorders, and all, so I was definitely interested. I was also however a little afraid to go into it, as sometimes reading about cutting makes a part of me long to start cutting again. I ended up reading this book within one day… and spent a very good portion of that day in tears.

With that in mind, it should be no surprise that this was a very difficult read. It was emotionally draining because of what the characters were going through. It deals with some hard subject matter – important, but hard. And I’m sure there are a lot of parents who wouldn’t want their children to read a book that starts with a failed suicide attempt… but there are going to be a lot of people who will relate in some way to this book. And for that reason alone, for the fact that there may be even just one person out there who has a mental illness who would read this and realize that what they are not alone and that other people have mental illnesses, well that makes this a wonderful book.

What I really like about Her is that even though the protagonist is working through BPD, that’s not all we get to see. We are introduced to people who were sexually abused as children, who are heroin addicts, who have eating disorders, who are schizophrenic. We see a lot, and I think that is really great for introducing readers to a large number of things that we may not necessarily come into contact with every day. It showcases mental issues that a lot of people have, and it does a really good job at making them more understandable, empathizable and accessible.

There was one thing that didn’t quite sit well with me about Her. There were characters that were obviously Christian, and they were the employees at the mental hospital. They spoke about their faith with Kristen, and Kristen automatically accepted what they told her without questioning or investigating on her own. On one hand, I know what it’s like to need something to hope for when suffering from depression and clinging to faith for that hope… but on the other hand, it would have felt a lot less like we were being witnessed to if there was even a character who was representative of another faith… or even who was an atheist.

The characters in this seemed thoroughly developed – especially Kristen, who shows the different aspects of BPD well. One thing I did find was that, because of the fact that Kristen has BPD and the story was being told from her perspective, I couldn’t always trust what seemed to be happening to actually be happening. Characters often seemed to go from calm to screaming in a matter of seconds with little to provoke them. Or seemed to be pushing Kristen to do or feel a certain way and not understanding that she couldn’t just hit a switch to make everything better. (This actually is how a lot of people react to mental illnesses, and so I’m really glad it was illustrated here how frustrating and agonizing it can be when someone tells a person with a mental illness to “just not be depressed” or whatever.)

The Bottom Line

I will definitely be looking forward to reading more by Johnson, and recommend this book to people who are living with a mental illness – whether in themselves, their family or a friend.

Blog Tour Stops for January 14!

Blog stops for the Dreams Come True Promotions! Are you having fun yet?

My Fictional Boyfriend & Book Whore Page

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