National Alliance On Mental Illness NAMI Gwinnett Presents Educational Speaker Felicia Johnson




Felicia Johnson Author, Speaker Event NAMI Carroll County Mental Health Advocates

Carroll County Mental Health Advocates

Author, Felicia Johnson – Author Page, will be the presenter at NAMI Carroll’s and Carroll County Mental Health Advocates’ Educational Night on July 30th at 6 PM at the Carrollton Courthouse. Please join us so Felicia can share her knowledge as a mental health worker, survivor and advocate of those dealing with borderline personality disorder. She will bring copies of her book with her.

CMHA & NAMI Carroll invite everyone to the Educational Night on July 30th from 6:00 pm to 7:30 pm. featuring Felicia Johnson, speaking about Borderline Personality Disorder. This event will be at the Carroll County Court House, and it will be very insightful! Please like our page, and share this event on your walls to help spread the word!



It’s mental health awareness month! Let’s show some love and support.


Happy Mental Health Awareness Month!

May is Mental Health Awareness Month. It’s a great month to help support causes in raising awareness on mental health and promoting prevention of suicide and self harm.

Please help our friends at NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Augusta NAMI, Augusta, Georgia, Inc. – National Alliance on Mental Illness in their mission to help people build better lives for themselves and their families. Their goal is to raise enough funds to build and maintain a Respite Center where individuals who face mental health crises can go for a reprieve for up to a week.

NAMI GA Cobb Educational Speakers Series feat. Author, Felicia Johnson Video & Testimonials


On February 19, 2015 I had the honor of speaking at The National Alliance On Mental Illness (NAMI) NAMI Georgia, NAMI Cobb. I was part of their Education Speaker Series. Thank you to President of NAMI Cobb, Mrs. Neill Blake for inviting me out to speak to NAMI Georgia’s Cobb Chapter. Also, thank you to Mrs. Pamela Burton for her support and interest.

pam burton girl and fee

I joined NAMI that evening to discuss my experience in dealing with my own experience with child abuse, depression and losing my childhood best friend to suicide. My best friend, Holly, suffered with depression and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD).

fee speaking cobb

I discussed my novel, Her, which is the story of a young girl dealing with BPD that was inspired by Holly and my journey.  My goal was to help bring understanding of BPD within reach of many young people and families afflicted.

It was heartwarming to meet with fans who follow me on on social media and who have read my books. It was so great to see people come out to support the cause. I signed a few books after the Q&A panel where I answered questions about BPD, my survival through trauma and my novel, Her.

fee signing

I continue to help many come to terms with mental health & wellness and talk about it with hopes of putting an end to the stigma that is on mental health issues today.

fee and patricia

Testimonials from NAMI GA, Cobb speech:

“After hearing Felicia Johnson speak about her new book, “Her,” I was amazed at her honesty and strength. While sharing feelings of her best friend who was the inspiration for the book, we became more and more interested to hear what she had to say. During the presentation, Felicia’s energy filled the room grasping our attention and I felt her life was completely changed by the relationship she had had with her close friend. I didn’t really know a lot about this mental health challenge, but now know that many people live with this little shared life struggle. From that moment, I wanted to read her book and experience the poetic language and engaging storyline that I knew would be present in the book.” – Mary McCrary

“I learned a lot about BPD and how it can effect those who care about people who suffer with it. Felicia’s story about her and her best friend brought me to tears! I can’t wait to read her book.” – Christine B.

“I wanted to read Felicia’s book to learn more about Borderline Personality Disorder. After I read it, I had to see her speak and she came around near where I live and I was happy to see her speak live. I hope that we’ll get to see her speak again. I think everyone who knows someone who has a mental illness should hear her speak about her struggle and survival and also read her book. She is moving!”  – Terri Johnson

neill blake and fee1

“I would indeed recommend asking Felicia Johnson to speak… it was an educational talk as well as an inspirational perspective of living with mental illness. I also bought and read Felicia’s novel, Her. I started it last week and read it in just a few days. It kept my attention and gave me some good insights into the dynamics of inpatient facilities. I recommend both Felicia and her book.” – Neill Blake, President of NAMI Cobb, Georgia

Click here to watch the video of the NAMI Cobb Speech.

pam burton and fee

Up Close & Personal Magazine Article – Her: A Novel Inspired By Loss

This is a text version of the magazine article that was printed this month in Up Close & Personal. In the article, I wrote about how my novel was inspired by my dear late friend Holly and my first writing experience.

Please, take a look and let me know what you think! 🙂


Up Close & Personal Volume 11 Issue 3

Her: A Novel Inspired By Loss
“Tucker is the place my husband, Dee, and I currently call home. We have lived in Tucker for almost six years. We are originally from the Northeast. I was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. I lived there until I was nine years old, and my family and I moved here to Georgia when I was ten.
When I was six, my second grade teacher, Ms. Medley, gave me my first composition notebook. About a day later, Ms. Medley gave the class our first writing assignment. The only rule of the assignment was to write one paragraph about something that we wanted.
My first writing assignment was titled: I Want A Dog. It is interesting what happens when a person who was born to write actually begins to write. Paragraph one started with how much I would have liked to have a dog (very much), why (because they are are so cute and fluffy), and why I couldn’t have one (our home was too small to keep one). Then, when I finished with the reason as to why I couldn’t have a dog, I began a second paragraph. Paragraph two stated why I should have a dog despite having a small home (I’d take good care of the dog, and let it sleep in my bed). It was only right that the third paragraph listed what kind of dogs I would have, and paragraph four listed different names I would have named my dog. By the time I ran out of pages in my composition notebook, I hadn’t realized that I had written 100 pages. Scared that I’d get in trouble, I showed my mother what I had written.
My mother found it amusing that I had written 100 pages about wanting a dog. Instead of making me do my assignment again, the way it had been assigned, my mother told me to turn it in. Monday morning came, and Ms. Medley collected all of our notebooks, and read a few good paragraphs aloud. I was nervous and afraid of when she’d see my written assignment. When she finally did see what I had written, she held up my notebook to the class and said aloud, ‘Felicia has written a novel! It is called I Want A Dog.’
I was shocked. I didn’t know what a novel was or how to even make one, but I’d somehow done it. After school, Ms. Medley took the time to explain to me what a novel is. She said it is a prose narrative made up of characters, wishes, wants, emotions, feelings, and expressions. She told me that the writers who produce these novels are called authors. Ms. Medley said that if I keep writing, filling up a hundred-plus pages of notebooks, then one day I could be an author. I asked her if I was in trouble for doing the assignment incorrectly. Ms. Medley’s reply was not what I had expected. She said, ‘Felicia, the assignment was completely correctly as long as it was written by you, and you feel that everything you want to express is in the story.’ I told her I felt that everything was there. Then she replied, “Okay. You’re a writer. Keep on writing.”
I will never forget Ms. Medley’s encouraging words because those words moved me to keep writing through my adolescent years. Coping with depression through writing saved my life. Writing helped me not to use depression as an excuse not to accomplish my goals in life.
Growing up was challenging because I had young parents. I am the oldest of my mother’s four children. My mother was fifteen years old when she became pregnant with me. It wasn’t long after that my little brothers, Barry and Anthony, and little sister, Laura, came along. My mother was a single parent for most of my teenage years. I took on a lot of responsibility, and I helped my mother take care of my brothers and sister. Being forced to grow up fast has its consequences. I developed depression in my adolescent years. Like most children with depression, I was put on medication and saw a therapist to help deal with my depression. However, I found that writing was the best therapy.
When I was fifteen years old, I had a best friend named Holly. Holly was diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder. I saw the challenges that she and her family faced while she suffered. My friend lost the battle with depression due to BPD. She committed suicide when she was only fifteen years old. I learned, after Holly’s death, that she’d had Borderline Personality Disorder. I didn’t know what BPD was until I did research on it. It was confusing to me at the time. I began to study mental health, depression, and personality disorders. I wrote journals about my memories of Holly, our friendship, and what it was like growing up. Before I realized it, the journal had turned into a novel of great memories.
Years after Holly’s death, I had an idea to write a story about a girl who suffered from depression and BPD, but then somehow survived all that she had been through. So, I started on a story, with Holly in mind. Although the story is not about Holly, I wanted to write something that I could dedicate to her. I wasn’t sure where I was going with this story, but I started writing as I did with all of the stories I had written. I wrote the first outline of what the story would be about, and the main characters, but I didn’t quite have an ending for the story.
When I wrote the original version of Her, the main character had a different ending than the version that is being published now. I won’t give away the ending, but I will say that I feel like Holly would be proud of the ending that you, as the reader, will read today. If Holly had given herself a chance to be a survivor, I think she would say that this new ending is the ending that she could have had.
I wish that Holly had given herself a chance to grow up. She would have seen that the pain she had felt when she was a child, in the hard life that she had lived, would not last forever. Although it was hard for us growing up, there was a chance for us to become healthy, strong, and happy people. I wish that she was here so that I could give her a hug. As I would hug Holly, I’d say, ‘See? We made it. We’re okay. And we are still the ‘bestest’ of friends!’
I dedicate my debut novel, Her, to Holly. Her is not Holly’s story, but she did provide hope and inspiration. I dedicate this story to my dear friend’s memory. Even though the story is not about her, it illustrates the complex illness of Borderline Personality Disorder. Readers – including those suffering from BPD and their friends and family – can glean insight into the mind of a person who has BPD. It is scary and even funny at times. It is a story about strength and survival.
Currently, I am studying Clinical Psychology and the subject of Personality Disorders has always stood out for me in my studies and experiences.
My husband, Dee, is originally from New York. He came here to attend college back in 2006. College is where we met and fell in love. Always the comic relief, he was the guy who made me laugh the most. It is not surprising to me, and our friends who knew us back in college, that he is a stand-up comedian. Dee performs his comedy in around Atlanta, sometimes at the Laughing Skull Lounge.
I can honestly say that my husband taught me how to laugh, love with an open heart, and never give up. Dee encouraged me to continuously pursue my ambition to become a published author. I’m happy to be married to my best friend and number one supporter. He encourages me to write every day.
When I write, I don’t feel alone. It is because writing brings out many relatable emotions and thoughts to share with others. I don’t only write for myself, but I write for others. I enjoy research, solving issues, and helping people, especially through my writing. I try to always write with a purpose. It is as Maya Angelou said, ‘I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget with you did, but people will not forget how you made them feel.’
I write to make my readers feel.”
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