Mind Power and Healthy Eating : The Art of Losing Weight and Staying HealthyMind Power and Healthy Eating : The Art of Losing Weight and Staying Healthy by Josephine Spire

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I like educational reads that aren’t preachy but are actually helpful. It reads almost like a thesis! “Mind Power and Healthy Eating: The Art of Losing Weight and Staying Healthy” by Josephine Spire is a very thorough guide that breaks down the facts on how and why we should maintain a healthy lifestyle. It’s not for someone who is looking to get on a quick diet and lose weight. This book is for people who want to live a healthy life and stick with a certain type of healthy lifestyle. I like that it starts with mind centering techniques before getting into the physical improvement aspect. I can appreciate that aspect because our mind has to focus and be in the right place before we can move forward. That’s to get you more aware of what will and won’t work for you in choosing what healthy lifestyle work’s for you. In the next part of the book it breaks down foods, exercises and gives wisdom to the reader on practicing mindfulness. You have to be aware of what works for you because not everyone is the same. And I appreciate that Spire makes it clear that you must choose what will work for you so that you can stick to it and live your life healthily. All in all, it is a helpful and easy guide to read and offers great exercises, techniques and wisdom. I breezed right through it. I recommend this book to anyone who is looking to not only lose weight, but those who want to become more mindful of their bodies and chose a way to live a healthy life.

~~~Felicia Johnson author of “HER” and “OK Danny Boy”

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NAMI GA Cobb Educational Speakers Series feat. Author, Felicia Johnson Video & Testimonials

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On February 19, 2015 I had the honor of speaking at The National Alliance On Mental Illness (NAMI) NAMI Georgia, NAMI Cobb. I was part of their Education Speaker Series. Thank you to President of NAMI Cobb, Mrs. Neill Blake for inviting me out to speak to NAMI Georgia’s Cobb Chapter. Also, thank you to Mrs. Pamela Burton for her support and interest.

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I joined NAMI that evening to discuss my experience in dealing with my own experience with child abuse, depression and losing my childhood best friend to suicide. My best friend, Holly, suffered with depression and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD).

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I discussed my novel, Her, which is the story of a young girl dealing with BPD that was inspired by Holly and my journey.  My goal was to help bring understanding of BPD within reach of many young people and families afflicted.

It was heartwarming to meet with fans who follow me on on social media and who have read my books. It was so great to see people come out to support the cause. I signed a few books after the Q&A panel where I answered questions about BPD, my survival through trauma and my novel, Her.

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I continue to help many come to terms with mental health & wellness and talk about it with hopes of putting an end to the stigma that is on mental health issues today.

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Testimonials from NAMI GA, Cobb speech:

“After hearing Felicia Johnson speak about her new book, “Her,” I was amazed at her honesty and strength. While sharing feelings of her best friend who was the inspiration for the book, we became more and more interested to hear what she had to say. During the presentation, Felicia’s energy filled the room grasping our attention and I felt her life was completely changed by the relationship she had had with her close friend. I didn’t really know a lot about this mental health challenge, but now know that many people live with this little shared life struggle. From that moment, I wanted to read her book and experience the poetic language and engaging storyline that I knew would be present in the book.” – Mary McCrary

“I learned a lot about BPD and how it can effect those who care about people who suffer with it. Felicia’s story about her and her best friend brought me to tears! I can’t wait to read her book.” – Christine B.

“I wanted to read Felicia’s book to learn more about Borderline Personality Disorder. After I read it, I had to see her speak and she came around near where I live and I was happy to see her speak live. I hope that we’ll get to see her speak again. I think everyone who knows someone who has a mental illness should hear her speak about her struggle and survival and also read her book. She is moving!”  – Terri Johnson

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“I would indeed recommend asking Felicia Johnson to speak… it was an educational talk as well as an inspirational perspective of living with mental illness. I also bought and read Felicia’s novel, Her. I started it last week and read it in just a few days. It kept my attention and gave me some good insights into the dynamics of inpatient facilities. I recommend both Felicia and her book.” – Neill Blake, President of NAMI Cobb, Georgia

Click here to watch the video of the NAMI Cobb Speech.

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How Did She Do it?

“Trust me, if we could just ‘get over it’ we would!” – Felicia Johnson, Author of Her and nominee of the Gutsy Gals Inspire Me Award 2014

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Do you remember when I first told you about Holls?

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Holls was my best friend when I was fifteen years old. Her real name was Holly, but everyone that she had considered to be a friend had called her Holls.

It’s been sixteen years since I had last seen Holls. She had a very infectious nature. She would make you laugh whenever she did something silly, whether it was intentional or not. And she could help you to see the most deepest meanings in the smallest things that you wouldn’t even consider looking deeper at as a teenager. Holls had a way about her that could make you laugh and cry at the same time. You would’nt know if you started laughing so hard that you were crying because of something funny she had said or did, or if you had started off crying because of a trick she may have played on you that scared you so badly that you ended up laughing at yourself in the end. That’s what Holly did. She made you feel special in every moment you spent with her…until the end.

Both of us had suffered from depression. We met while we were so called “troubled kids” during our group therapy meetings. We were child abuse survivors. The group therapy meetings taught us how to cope and heal from our past child abuse. Holls also had what is called Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). At the time, I didn’t know what that was. I think that I used to get BPD confused with Bi-Polar disorder or Multiple Personality Disorder. Either way, I was wrong. Borderline Personality Disorder is classified as a mental illness that is followed by an an intense unstable personality and emotional disruptive patterns which causes instability in relationships, impulsivity, self image, and can cause one to self harm and make threats about committing suicide. A person suffering from BPD may even commit suicide, whether they were reaching out for help by admitting suicidal ideation, or not.

Now that I’ve learned more about mental illness and mental health, I’ve become more aware of the importance of discussing these issues. I speak out because families, friends, and loved ones of those who suffer from mental illnesses tend to not know how to help the ones that they love. I speak out to educate and provide hope for them and those who are suffering.

Since writing my novel HerI’ve been able to speak out to raise awareness about child abuse, mental health, mental illness, and promote prevention. Raising awareness about child abuse, mental health, mental illness, and promoting prevention is positive! These may not be LIGHT subjects and some people may see them as taboo and something to censor. But when you have examples of successful survivors and thrivers with incredible stories of hope, love and inspiration that does help others, it IS POSITIVE. This is how we end the stigma! Speaking out is something that I will continue to do until it is no longer possible. And I hope that others will continue to speak out long after that time.

Often times, I’ve been asked, “How did she do it?” as in “How did Holly commit suicide?” If you’re someone who has lost someone that you love or care about to suicide, have you ever been asked this question? If so, how did it make you feel?

Honestly, I can tell you, that no matter who asks me this, I’ve always been taken aback. First, when my mother asked after I had found out, I was shocked. Then, when mutual friends of Holls’ and mine asked, and I didn’t really know if I should say that I even knew at the time how or why, just that it happened. When the therapists asked when they were trying to help, I felt confused as to why they would even ask that particular question. Even now, I’m still shocked when people that I meet in my campaign to raise awareness and promote prevention ask that specific question, “How did she do it?”. From radio hosts to other professionals who have asked, I am still taken aback each time someone has the audacity to ask.

To me, it is not offensive. I have considered several reasons why anyone would ask. One: out of curiosity. Two: genuine care and concern because people may think that “talking about the details” can be greatly therapeutic. Three: for reasons of their own that has nothing to do with me or Holly which could be entertainment or shock value, etc. I’m sure that there are other reasons, but these are the ones that I tend to wonder about when I am asked how did Holly commit suicide.

Every time I’m asked how did she commit suicide, I answer the same: She suffered with depression and BPD and she lost her battle with her mental illness. That is the best answer that I can give that will help people to understand why and how something like this could happen. It can happen to any of us who suffer from depression and who do not have the right support from our families, friends, and loved ones; the people who truly matter to us. The best thing that we can do is educate ourselves about these issues, do not ignore them, do not pretend that they do not exist, and do not try censor anyone who wants to speak out about their own experiences or others. This is the only way that we will end the stigma of mental illness!

#nostigma #nocensor #Speaktruth

Black & White Thinking – A symptom associated with BPD – Borderline Personality Disorder

Loving1today: Loving1with Black and White Thinking.


This is contributed by community member Fee Johnson for Loving1withmentalillness.com

Black and white thinking is one of the classic symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). Black and white thinking is characterized by the following statements:
“I love you”
“I hate you”
“Stay with me”
“Leave me alone”
They push you away, then pull you back in. You will find these types of behaviors in relationships with those who have BPD.

There is a lot of polarized thinking while living with BPD. The sufferer has to be perfect and good, or else they are bad. In their world, there is to be no in between. Even one mistake, no matter how small or trivial, can make a person with BPD feel as if they are a failure and do not deserve to live.

When you care for someone who has BPD, this can sometimes be confusing, and hard to deal with. In order to support someone with BPD in becoming more stable in their emotions, help them settle these extreme thoughts and behaviors.

It is important to recognize the symptoms and behavioral patterns to find an in between. Instead of giving into the extremes of the black and white thinking, you can help the person with BPD find areas of grey. Understanding, patience, and empathy are needed.
You can help guide an emotionally unstable person to a place where they can accept that one mistake doesn’t make them bad. The world is not black or white and good or bad. Therefore, we can appreciate the shades of grey and thus help balance our lives into healthier directions.

Support our community member Fee by clicking on the link below to access her book “Her” which illustrates what it is like to live with BPD.

Black and White Thinking: Written by Fee Johnson, Edited by Debra DeLash
www.herthebook.com

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