Mind Power and Healthy Eating : The Art of Losing Weight and Staying HealthyMind Power and Healthy Eating : The Art of Losing Weight and Staying Healthy by Josephine Spire

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I like educational reads that aren’t preachy but are actually helpful. It reads almost like a thesis! “Mind Power and Healthy Eating: The Art of Losing Weight and Staying Healthy” by Josephine Spire is a very thorough guide that breaks down the facts on how and why we should maintain a healthy lifestyle. It’s not for someone who is looking to get on a quick diet and lose weight. This book is for people who want to live a healthy life and stick with a certain type of healthy lifestyle. I like that it starts with mind centering techniques before getting into the physical improvement aspect. I can appreciate that aspect because our mind has to focus and be in the right place before we can move forward. That’s to get you more aware of what will and won’t work for you in choosing what healthy lifestyle work’s for you. In the next part of the book it breaks down foods, exercises and gives wisdom to the reader on practicing mindfulness. You have to be aware of what works for you because not everyone is the same. And I appreciate that Spire makes it clear that you must choose what will work for you so that you can stick to it and live your life healthily. All in all, it is a helpful and easy guide to read and offers great exercises, techniques and wisdom. I breezed right through it. I recommend this book to anyone who is looking to not only lose weight, but those who want to become more mindful of their bodies and chose a way to live a healthy life.

~~~Felicia Johnson author of “HER” and “OK Danny Boy”

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Help Me! by Donna M. Zadunajsky Book Review

HELP ME! (HELP ME! #1)HELP ME! by Donna M. Zadunajsky

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Help Me! by Donna M. Zadunajsky was a very interesting read. I liked it because it read like a personal journal from the the first point of view of the main characters. I’m a huge fan of journaling, so the writing style felt voyeuristic. It was avant-garde in a sense that the writing style is not what I am used to reading in a book.

It’s like reading a book on social media. As the reader, you’re taken into the private thoughts and experiences of two main characters. Mick is suicidal and depressed after losing his best friend to suicide. Layla is Mick’s new best friend that he acquires after he moves to his father’s home following the loss of his late best friend. We get to see the perspectives of teenage life, love and friendship through the thoughts of Mick and Layla. I like the interchanging approach to the chapters so that we can see the point of views from both characters and know what they’re both thinking and feeling within each scene that plays out. We’re not left with many questions as both main characters cover their own thoughts and emotions, themselves, without leaving it to a third narrator’s POV. The style is unique. Therefore, it made it feel personal.

Overall, it was a fast paced, good read. I hope that there’s more to come.

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Book Review: Through The Eyes Of Serial Killers By Nadia Fezzani

 

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Through The Eyes Of Serial Killers by Nadia Fezzani is more than just a book about the accounts of seven murderers. This book takes you directly into the mind of a serial killer where the deep, dark disturbing facts are laid out for us in this gripping novel. What makes a serial killer? Where do they come from? How did it all begin? These questions are answered in Fezzani’s book directly by the serial killers that she interviewed.

This book is very well written in an interview style format. While I was reading, I felt as if I was watching it all play in my mind. Fezzani’s journalist background really shows throughout the book as she asked the most bold and interesting questions that readers would want to know about the lives of serial killers. These interviews are uncensored and challenging. I couldn’t imagine, myself, sitting across from a serial killer asking daring questions. It is amazing how they seemed to have opened up to her. Fezzani breaks it down for you in her book. From the trauma of childhood, mental illness, abuse, and the type of psychology and reasoning that these serial killers use when they have committed these violent crimes.

The most riveting interview in the book, for me, was with Joel Rifkin. His interview can be found in Chapter 5 titled Joel Rifkin: Joel The Ripper. Without giving too much away, the interview is gripping and starts off heavy and right to the point. Fezzani asks, “And then you decapitated her with an X-Acto Knife?” To which Rifkin boldly replied, “Yeah. It’s just like a scalpel. It’s easy to get into joints and then you can pop bones from the socket.” The interview takes off right there. But from the very beginning of it, I was drawn into reading more.

The book is fast moving. Easy to read and understand. It is disturbing, because the subject matter is not a light one. There is a point to this book. It digs deep into the psychology of serial killing to explore the theories surrounding the making of a serial killer. The book is educational and seems to lean towards having the purpose of helping people understand serial killers to create better programs and strategies to help prevent this kind of violence in the future. There is a bit of humanity here. Hopefully, something we can all appreciate and understand.

~~Felicia Johnson

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Nadia Fezzani, Author of Through The Eyes of Serial Killers: Interviews With Seven Murderers

More information about Nadia Fezzani can be found at http://www.nadiafezzani.com/.

Also, her book is available for purchase on Amazon.com. Direct link: http://www.amazon.com/Through-Eyes-Serial-Killers-Interviews/dp/1459724674

Her by Felicia Johnson Review by Personality Disorders Awareness Network PDAN

Her by Felicia Johnson.

Review of When You Bleed To Death by Jeremy Bronaugh

It’s BPD Awareness Month and Mental Health Awareness Month. What books would be appropriate to read and review other than books based on mental health and BPD. This book takes the reader into the mind of a young man who struggles with BPD and various emotional and mental health issues stemming from the disturbances in his every day life and unstable relationships.

This is my review of When You Bleed To Death by Jeremy Bronaugh.

when you bleed

Brody is depressed and self destructive. Struggling to cope with his girlfriend’s suicide, Brody turns to drugs and self harming for relief. His friendships are short lived and unhealthy, and he doesn’t seem to be able to keep up with school. It seems like his life just can’t get better. Perhaps it’s because Brody runs away, pushes people away and hurts himself especially when he feels like he’s being wronged.

His relationship with Tiffany is very troubled. He stalks her when they break up and against his better judgement seems to dig himself a deeper hole each time they try to reconcile. Just when you think things could get better for Brody, it seems to go in the opposite direction. The way the book ends leaves me wondering about him and what route he decided to take. It seems like a sad ending that you may be able to figure out. Although, I do wonder if it’s actually what I think may be the end of Brody’s story…

Check out Jeremy Bronaugh on Amazon and Goodreads!

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Jeremy-Bronaugh/e/B00PNYCQEQ

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/9863914.Jeremy_Bronaugh

Book Review of Haseena Patel’s I Choose Victory

I Choose Victory: Find Light In The Darkness Of A Life Changing Crisis by Haseena Patel

victory

Book Review

Have you ever received a letter from a dear friend that touched your heart? Have you ever read a story that was so emotional that you could not help but feel every word that was written?

I Choose Victory: Find Light In The Darkness Of A Life Changing Crisis by Haseena Patel is a novel that will make the reader feel. When I first started reading this book, it felt like a personal letter from a dear friend. Haseena Patel fills the pages with heartfelt encouragement to her readers. She encourages her readers with positive quotes from prominent writers, speakers, and influential public figures. One of my favorite quotes in her book was written by A.A. Milne that reads, “If ever there is tomorrow when we’re not together, there is something you must always remember, you are braver than you believe, stronger than you seem and smarter than you think…” It’s a powerful message. And no wonder that Patel would use this quote in her book.

Patel’s book is based on dealing with family crisis. She tells of her experiences with helping her sister through a chronic illness that threatened her sister’s life. It’s a heartfelt story of struggle, positive change, growth and finding purpose in life through weaknesses and strength.

I’ve learned by reading Ms. Patel’s book that no matter what crisis you’re faced with, you can overcome. With hope and purpose you will get through it. You must choose to be victorious.

Felicia Johnson, Author of “HER http://www.herthebook.com and http://www.feliciajohnsonauthor.com

 

Once Upon A Bookshelf Book Review of Her by Felicia Johnson

Once Upon A Bookshelf

A Reader’s Blog

HER 
 
Posted by Courtney Wilson @ 8:08 am June 19, 2014.
Category: Young Adult
Book Author(s):
Publisher(s):      Her front cover
Author: Felicia Johnson
Originally Published: 2013
Publisher: 8th Street Publishing
Source: Received a copy from the author

When I did the interview with Felicia Johnson, I received a digital copy of her book. The topic really intrigued me. I’m a proponent for the end of the stigma surrounding mental illnesses, disorders, and all, so I was definitely interested. I was also however a little afraid to go into it, as sometimes reading about cutting makes a part of me long to start cutting again. I ended up reading this book within one day… and spent a very good portion of that day in tears.

With that in mind, it should be no surprise that this was a very difficult read. It was emotionally draining because of what the characters were going through. It deals with some hard subject matter – important, but hard. And I’m sure there are a lot of parents who wouldn’t want their children to read a book that starts with a failed suicide attempt… but there are going to be a lot of people who will relate in some way to this book. And for that reason alone, for the fact that there may be even just one person out there who has a mental illness who would read this and realize that what they are not alone and that other people have mental illnesses, well that makes this a wonderful book.

What I really like about Her is that even though the protagonist is working through BPD, that’s not all we get to see. We are introduced to people who were sexually abused as children, who are heroin addicts, who have eating disorders, who are schizophrenic. We see a lot, and I think that is really great for introducing readers to a large number of things that we may not necessarily come into contact with every day. It showcases mental issues that a lot of people have, and it does a really good job at making them more understandable, empathizable and accessible.

There was one thing that didn’t quite sit well with me about Her. There were characters that were obviously Christian, and they were the employees at the mental hospital. They spoke about their faith with Kristen, and Kristen automatically accepted what they told her without questioning or investigating on her own. On one hand, I know what it’s like to need something to hope for when suffering from depression and clinging to faith for that hope… but on the other hand, it would have felt a lot less like we were being witnessed to if there was even a character who was representative of another faith… or even who was an atheist.

The characters in this seemed thoroughly developed – especially Kristen, who shows the different aspects of BPD well. One thing I did find was that, because of the fact that Kristen has BPD and the story was being told from her perspective, I couldn’t always trust what seemed to be happening to actually be happening. Characters often seemed to go from calm to screaming in a matter of seconds with little to provoke them. Or seemed to be pushing Kristen to do or feel a certain way and not understanding that she couldn’t just hit a switch to make everything better. (This actually is how a lot of people react to mental illnesses, and so I’m really glad it was illustrated here how frustrating and agonizing it can be when someone tells a person with a mental illness to “just not be depressed” or whatever.)

The Bottom Line

I will definitely be looking forward to reading more by Johnson, and recommend this book to people who are living with a mental illness – whether in themselves, their family or a friend.